Where Is Your Cat Going At Night?

Where Is Your Cat Going At Night? One of the more frustrating and worrying things for cat owners is when their cat doesn’t come home at night, no matter how much they call their cat’s name or try to entice them with their favourite food. The three questions cat owners want to know are: “Where is my cat going”, “Why does my cat want to be outside all night”, and “Should I try to stop my cat from roaming the streets at night?” Here we answer all three. Where is my cat going? Most cat owners like to believe their cats will come home when called. When this doesn’t happen, they convince themselves the cat must be travelling huge distances miles away and can’t hear them. Unfortunately, this is often not the case. Since the introduction of GPS cat collars that let us track our cat’s movements during the night, it has become clear that the majority of the time cats are roaming well within a 100-150 meter radius. Whether it’s a neighbour who is giving your cat some extra treats or just a nice cosy spot with a good view, your cat is usually close by. Why does my cat want to be outside all night? Cats are naturally nocturnal creatures. Their pupils are able to open very wide in low light giving them excellent vision at night, and their whiskers help them feel out spaces they can and can’t go. Even though they might be getting all the food and play time they could want at home, most cats instinctually want to get out at night to stalk prey, check out other cats entering their territory, or even find a potential lover for the night! Should I try to stop my cat from roaming the streets at night? This is a controversial question. Some cat owners believe that if they don’t let their cat out at night, he or she may get frustrated from not being able to satisfy their instinctual urges which may cause the cat to misbehave more at home for example by clawing furniture. On the other hand, there are many dangers that cats face at night. They can get into fights, get stuck somewhere they can’t escape from, or even be hit by a car. Ultimately, the decision of whether or not to stop your cat leaving the house at night is a decision each cat owner must make for themselves and their cat.